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Sample Assignments

The Undergraduate Assessment Committee (formerly the General Education Committee) must approve all Critical Thinking through Writing (CTW) courses.  The following CTW assignments are examples of some of the many wonderful assignments submitted for consideration.

Anthropology

Applied Linguistics

Biology

Criminal Justice

Computer Science

Philosophy

Political Science

Real Estate

All CTW course data must be submitted to the CTW Proposal Template.  Click here for a list of the information Ambassadors will need to provide in the template.

Anthropology ANTH 4970 Senior Seminar

Assignments

Assignment 1: Theory and Method

Choose an article in your preferred field of anthropology. It can be an article you’ve read before for another class or an article that is new to you, but it must be in a peer-reviewed publication within the discipline of anthropology. In a 2-3 page essay, discuss the content of the article very briefly, then discuss the theoretical basis of the article (what theory or theorists are cited?), how theory is important to the findings or conclusions of the researcher, what methods are being used, how methods relate to theory (if applicable), and how well, in your opinion, the author did in terms of incorporating theory into his/her conclusions. Note that whereas major theories you are familiar with may not be referenced, there is probably still a theoretical basis to the article. Make sure to include a full citation for the article.

Assignment 4, Mini journal article, due March 28

For this assignment, you will reformulate and edit a paper you have written for another anthropology class in the past into a format that would be acceptable for the journal American Anthropologist. You can write the paper on the same topic as your oral presentation if you wish. Use the following style guide to format references: http://www.aaanet.org/pubs/style_guide.htm
You can look at other American Anthropologist articles on JSTOR through our library’s computer system for samples; here is their basic format for submission of articles, essays, and research reports (notes, figures, and tables are not necessary):

Submissions must include the following: (1) a cover page with paper title, author’s name, position, affiliation, and contact information, and a preferred running head; (2) an abstract of no more than 150 words ending with a bracketed list of three to five keywords or phrases; (3) body of the text; (4) notes, which may include acknowledgments before the first note (do not use footnote or endnote programs, and references should not be embedded); (5) references cited; (6) tables, if applicable; (7) figures, if applicable, accompanied by a list of figure captions.

For further info on American Anthropologist author guidelines, see: http://www.aaanet.org/aa/authorinfo.htm

Use American Anthropologist Research Reports or Research Articles as models, although your paper need not be more than 3-4 pages total (though it can be longer). You should have at least 3 bibliographic references. The paper does not have to be based on original research, but as with your abstract and future oral presentation, you should attempt to offer a new take or new insight on the material about which you are writing. You should go beyond simply fitting your paper to the format of the journal and focus on improving your writing and your arguments, perhaps based on comments you received on the paper. You will also be expected to complete two revisions of the paper based on comments I provide.

Assignment 5: Mini-hypothetical grant proposal

For this assignment, you will compose a grant proposal for a hypothetical research project following the guidelines below. You can be creative in suggesting your project topic, though the idea should be your own and it should relate to one or more of the four fields of anthropology. If you have not completed preliminary research on the topic you suggest, do some research about the location where you plan to study, about possible contacts you might make in the field, and about what the country requirements are for U.S. citizens (if you propose to conduct research outside of the U.S.), etc.

Grant proposal guidelines: Arrange your proposal into the following sections:

I. Title

II. Statement of Purpose (1 paragraph)
What is your project topic and where will it be conducted? What questions are you trying to answer? Why is the research important? What is new or innovative about this research?

III. Background Research and Theoretical Approach (2-3 paragraphs)
Who else has done research on topics related to your research problem? Whose work is relevant to your research? (Citations should be including for any works mentioned). What theories will inform the research you plan to conduct?

IV. Research Setting (1 paragraph)
Where will the research take place? Why is this location particularly significant in terms of your research questions?

V. Methodology (1-2 paragraphs)
Include a detailed summary about the methods you will use to collect and analyze your data. For example, what sampling techniques will you use, if any? What technology might be required to complete your project? How much time will the project require? Will you work alone or with assistants? Will your ability to speak another language be required to complete this research? Are there special permissions that need to be sought to conduct research on this topic or in this region?

VI. Significance of Project (1 paragraph)
Here you will not only reiterate the importance of the research, but also you may point out some of the possible applications of the research.

VI. Budget
Itemize the cost of this project. Here is a guide for items you might include:
Travel expenses:
Equipment/Technology needed (give details of each item):
Estimated living expenses:
Cost of hiring workers/assistants (if applicable):
Other:

VII. Bibliography

Rationale

Through these assignments, graduating majors will explore a variety of intellectual challenges as well as writing genres and styles that pertain to the domains of academic and professional anthropology. Multiple revisions of assignments will be encouraged and, in some cases, required.

30% of the course fulfills the CTW requirement.


Applied Linguistics AL 3031 Language in Society

Assignments

African American English in Schools

High schools in your school district have a large percentage of students who are monodialectal speakers of African-American English (AAE). Other students in the school district are monodialectal in non-stigmatized dialects of English, and a small percentage of students are bidialectal in AAE and a non-stigmatized dialect. Members of the school board are trying to decide what the school policy should be in terms of what dialects are taught or used in class. You know that some school board members are in favor of totally immersing all students in a variety of non-stigmatized English and correcting all uses of AAE, while others argue that AAE speakers should be encouraged to become bidialectal; that is, learn a non-stigmatized dialect for use in certain situations. What educational policy do you recommend? (You may put forward your own policy or choose one of those already favored by some board members.) What is your basis for choosing this policy, and what is your assessment of the policies you did not choose?

Rationale

This assignment, like the other (to be designed) homework assignments for the course, requires students to make a recommendation for addressing a common, real-world issue that involves prejudice, based on linguistic principles. Students will be provided with the rubric used to assess their work at the beginning of the semester, and essentially the same rubric will be used to assess all homework assignments (with some tweaking for individual assignments if appropriate). This will allow students to practice addressing different sociolinguistic issues in similar formats, so that they will have the opportunity to improve on their weaknesses in writing their next assignment.


Biology BIOL 3810 Molecular Cell Biology

Assignments

1. Students will make diagrams of the methods for their experiments. They will then write a paragraph in their own words describing the protocol.

2. Students will write logical, succinct and specific conclusions for data they have generated in their laboratory experiments.

3. Students will write two complete lab reports for experiments performed in the lab.

Rationale

#1 Students have a hard time visualizing setting up an experiment, having students make a diagram and write in their own words what they will do before they do it, will help students more critically analyze the experimental approach and logistical issues surrounding performance of experiments.

#2 Students feel that there is one “right answer” to the experiments and therefore, they usually write their conclusions accordingly. Thus, we strive to make them more critically analyze their data and make reasonable conclusions based on the data and not on their preconceived notions of what the “right answer” should be.

#3 Students do not have many experiences in writing lab reports so they will get the opportunity to critically analyze and synthesize all of the data with what is already known in the field and then suggest future experiments.


Criminal Justice CRJU 3020 Research Methods in Criminal Justice

SAMPLE CRITICAL THINKING THROUGH WRITING ASSIGNMENTS

The following are sample assignments that teaching faculty may use to meet the University’s CTW requirements. Faculty members retain discretion regarding which assignments best suit their individual courses; however, a substantial portion of the assignments and the resulting grades must be based on one or more critical thinking through writing assignments.

 

Sample Homework Assignments

Category I: Hypotheses formation

Assignment 1: Exercises on Writing Hypotheses (Glenn Harper)

1. Rewrite the following statements (see below) into a form which will make each a testable hypothesis.
A. Our elderly population is not physically healthy.
B. Juvenile delinquency is on the rise.
C. Poverty breeds violence.
D. Women are underpaid.
E. Men make lousy parent.
F. Catholics tend to be Democrats.
G. Frequent smoking increases the chance of lung cancer.
H. Bureaucracy stifles the creativity of law enforcement personnel.
I. Correctional treatment programs reduce the chance of re-offending.
J. Except for athletes, masculinity is inversely related to the occupational income of
males.

2. For each of your testable hypotheses identify, creating where necessary:
a. The independent variable and the categories over which it varies
b. The dependent variable and the categories over which it varies
c. Where appropriate the control variable and its categories
3. Identify the type of relationship expressed in your hypothesis.
4. Sketch a graph which would illustrate data supporting the hypothesis.
5. Identify the negative (deviant) cases for each hypothesis; each hypothesis has two sets of such cases.

Assignment 2

Directions: The purpose of this assignment is for you to develop two research problems that are of interest to you. The assignment is due XXXXXX, 200X at class time. Provide a detailed written response to each the following:

1. Write two research questions and identify the independent variable and dependent variables contained in each.

2. Next, locate one empirical or data-based study in the social science, criminology, or criminal justice journals that relates to each question. It is important that the variables identified in the research questions match (or be very similar to) those contained in the study itself. Answer all of the questions or statements below.

a. For each research study, state the researcher’s hypothesis involving the variables in question; that is, what did the researcher expect to find? Was the hypothesis justified adequately in terms of the theoretical framework? In terms of prior research?

b. Summarize briefly the findings as it pertains to the hypothesis in question. In other words, what did the researchers find?

c. Discuss the extent to which the hypothesis is supported or not supported by the study’s findings.

 

Category II: Literature Review

Assignment 1:
The Library: Locating and Using Selected Resources in the Social Sciences
(Dr. J.A. Ruggiero): Evaluating scholarly literature in the area of your research interest

An important part of doing any type of empirical research involves exploring and evaluating what is known in an area before you design a study. Your assignment is to learn more about your research topic and to summarize what you learn in an Introductory Statement which will accompany your research design.

A. Procedure

1. Select and critically evaluate at least 10 scholarly works pertinent to your research question. For each article discuss the following:

a. Generally, what has been reported?
b. What theories and variables have been considered relevant? Explain why.

In the main, you will be reading articles rather than books. Limit the number of books you review to two at most. Select articles from “scholarly journals” rather than from “popular journals” (e.g., Time, Newsweek, etc.) or web blogs for this assignment. If you do find some interesting and relevant articles in such magazines, you may read them if you wish but do not include them in your bibliography. As your search for references, start with the most recent years and work backward. Your reading should adequately cover the period of about the last ten years. Use the library resources discussed in class.

Some of you will be designing research studies on topics that have been popular in the literature whereas others of you will be exploring relatively new areas of research. Therefore, some of you will find many pertinent references and others may find relatively few. If you can not find approximately 10 relevant articles written between 1997and the present, search back farther in the literature to be sure that you haven’t missed anything worth examining. If you are still unable to find the sufficient articles on your research interest please discuss the matter with the instructor.

2. Attach a bibliography of references to your introductory statement.
Cite the complete reference for each work you read using the APA format as models. For a quick guide of citation format, please refer to the following web page created by Lyn Thaxton.

http://www.library.gsu.edu/files/research/68/citation-styles.pdf

List all bibliographic references in alphabetical order. If you read only part of the book, indicate the chapter or page numbers after the date of publication.

NOTE: Do not simply copy abstracts out of the electronic journals/ database. Once you locate the references you plan to use, determine whether or not the articles are available in the library (hard copies) or on line (full text). If you have trouble locating any articles, you should ask the reference librarian to see if they can assist you. Keep in mind that library research and article locating takes time.

3. Write up the results of your library research in an introductory statement of no more than 4-5 pages. Try to summarize, evaluate, and pull together ideas and research rather than report on each article you find in serial fashion (i.e., one after another).

Assignment 2: Literature Review

Directions: The purpose of this assignment is to write the introduction to your literature review. Write two to three pages that include the following components of your introduction. The introduction must be typed and double-spaced. Be sure to include bibliographic references on a separate page at the end of the introduction. The assignment is due XXXXX, 200X at class time.

A. Provide a broad overview of the problem to be studied by discussing the general framework (e.g., historical, substantive, theoretical, methodological) into which the current problem fits and mentioning trends and areas in which the subject remains problematic. Discuss the need of the research and describe the expected benefits that may be derived as a result of the research. That is, provide a clear identification of the rationale of the study by addressing why this research and its findings may be useful to criminal justice and/or criminology. Identify experts or authorities in the field that have researched this problem and/or those who have called for further research in this area.

B. After discussing the problem generally, shift the discussion to focus on the specific research problem or question under investigation. Identify the purpose (i.e., goal or direction) of the study by stating concisely the problem the research hopes to address or the question the research hopes to answer. In doing so, you must identify the limitations (i.e., weaknesses that potentially limit the validity of the results, including flaws in a study’s research design, sampling, method of data collection, operationalization of concepts, etc.) or delimitations (i.e., a boundary to which the study was deliberately confined, thus resulting in neglected or understudied aspects of the problem) of previous research. Next, state how your study intends to improve and/or build upon prior studies.

Category III: Field Study

Assignment 1

A. Select some setting in which you can observe at least three people interacting. There must be at least some difference in the statuses of the intereactants. You may be one of the participants. Possible settings are a classroom, a family discussion, or a bus ride.

Select a setting to which you can return for your structured observation at the beginning of March. (For the follow up observation the interactants need not be exactly the same but you must use the same setting).

B. Observe the interaction among the participants for thirty minutes to one hour. Take notes while you observe if possible, if not record your notes immediately after leaving the field.

C. Using only the information obtained during the observation write a paper-maximum length 5 typed pages-including the following:

1. describe the setting
2. describe your access to the setting
3. describe your role in the setting
4. describe the relative status of each participant
5. for each of the above be sure to indicate how you know each piece of information. What did you observe that told you what you know? You do not have to pretend to be a Martian (that is you can know what goes on in your culture) but you cannot use any prior knowledge of the people you are observing.

Assignment 2

Directions: The purpose of this assignment is to conduct an observational study of crime and deviance (e.g., observe prostitutes on a street corner or patrons at a bar or strip club), court proceedings (e.g., observe a juvenile court case), or the criminal processing of offenders (e.g., do a “ride-along” with the city police). Write a four to six page paper that describes your observations and evaluates your observation methods and strategies used. The paper must be typed and double-spaced. The assignment is due XXXXX, 200X at the beginning of class.

1. Describe the type of observational method used and what strategies you used to record or remember the observations. Discuss any problems that you encountered with the observational method and strategies employed.

2. What did you observe? Describe in detail the setting, people (including offenders, victims, and official agents of control as appropriate), and circumstances you observed.

3. What are some problems that you encountered while making your observations that may pose as threats to the reliability and validity of your observations? What would you do differently in future observations to avoid or eliminate these problems?

4. Observational data can be very useful in the development of research questions and hypotheses. Based upon the observations made, formulate two separate research questions and a hypothesis for each question.

Assignment 3: (Non-participant Observations of Brief, Face-to-face interactions)

Directions: Find a situation where brief, face-to-face interactions between two people take place very frequently-with one of the two people always being the same person; they should be brief so that you can observe 12 interactions in a fairly short period of time; clearly this should be a very public situation in which you can do your observations; e.g., information counters in Marta stations and bus terminals; counters in restaurants, bars, and taverns; busy news stands and convenient stores; waiting rooms, etc. Use your imagination in selecting a suitable locale. One important consideration in selecting a suitable locale is: can you take notes there without attracting attention? (e.g., without disturbing the situation by your presence).

Reporting details: The field work report to be handed in should contain at least the following–in 3-4 pages:
a. A sketch of the locale where you did your observations, indicating those features that are salient to the interactions that you are recording.
b. A recording of your actual observations, making sure that you keep observations and conclusions separate.
c. A brief summary, at the end, of what you have found out about the type of interaction represented by your small sample of 12 cases.

 

Category IV: Research Proposal

Research Proposal: The student will write a research proposal on a research problem in criminal justice or criminology. The student will submit one or more of the following components of the paper for review and feedback from the instructor prior to turning in the final project: an outline, elements of the proposal (abstract, introduction, literature review, etc.), or the completed paper in draft form.

Guidelines for the Research Proposal Paper

The basics:

. The paper must be NO less than 10 pages and NO MORE than 12 pages long.
. Page length includes the following
o The title page
o The “body” of the paper (i.e., the intro, methods, and budget)
. Page length does NOT include the following
o The abstract
o The references
o The appendices
. You must use 12 point font. Only Times New Roman or Arial are permissible (TNR will allow you to squeeze more in and Arial will allow you to meet the minimum page requirements)
. You must use 1-inch margins all the way around the paper
. The paper must have a page header in the upper right hand corner. It must be a smaller version of the title (no more than three words long) with a page number to its right
. You may include footnotes. They must be located at the bottom of the page where they are referenced (not at the end of the paper as an endnote). Footnotes must be in 10 point font
. The title page must NOT have a header or page number on it

Title Page

Abstract: The abstract goes on the second page. It is one paragraph, no more than 100 words long and is a summary of what the reader is about to see in the body of the proposal. Provide brief descriptions of the intro and methods but NOT the budget.

The Body: The body of the paper is composed of three main parts

1) The introduction/literature review. Should be around 4- 7 pages. Provides the reader with the research background of your project. The lit review can be done in two ways
o Temporal review: gives a history of the research that has preceded your proposal. Starts from earliest work and moves forward in time to the present.
o Conceptual review: provides the reader with previous research that has been conducted on different variables in your proposal. For example, if you are testing two variables – say, the effect of education and poverty on juvenile prostitution – the review would cover each variable separately. There would be a brief review of research on education and juvenile prostitution, then a brief review of the research on poverty and juvenile prostitution. That would lead up to your proposal which proposes to study the combined effects of education and poverty on juvenile prostitution.
. For the purposes of this paper I want you to use at LEAST six references (five of which must come from academic, refereed articles, and the sixth of which can come from an academic book). These sources must be original material (i.e., no magazine or newspaper articles, no web sites, and no textbooks).
. Use APA style for all referencing and general style requirements. You can find copies of the APA guide in the library.

2) Proposed Methods: This is where you describe what you will do with the money that you are asking for. Think of this section as if it were a “recipe” for conducting research. You must provide enough detail to the reader so that he/she knows what you are doing and how you will do it. You must include the “ingredients” (i.e., materials, forms, supplies, necessary personnel, etc.) as well as “instructions” (i.e., procedures) in this section. The following are GENERALLY what should be included in the methods, but this is totally up to you depending on what kind of proposal you are doing.
o Setting: If you are doing the research in a particular place and this place has an important role in the research then describe it here. For example if you are comparing an urban (i.e., Atlanta) city to a rural (i.e., Helen, GA) one in a proposed qualitative research project, you would provide crime statistics and demographic information for both places. You do not need a setting section if the setting is not crucial to the proposal (i.e., you don’t need one if all you are doing is a quantitative study of police suicide rates across the US).
o Participants: This is where you describe the individuals you are studying. Provide age, gender, and other demographic and criminal justice related information here. You don’t need this section if people are not what you are studying (for example, a study of how different newspapers report crime).
o Materials: This is where you describe any physical material you will need to use in your study. For example, a description of any psychological measures or surveys would go here (a description, but not the actual survey itself.that would go in the appendix). If you are going to use computers or other equipment, describe here.
o Procedures: This is where you describe the process of research, from start to finish (the “how to do it” portion). Include a timeline here.
o Budget justification: This is where you explain why you need to spend money on things (computers are needed to compile data, they cost this much. I will need a course release, it costs this much, etc.).

3) Budget: The budget is a spread sheet that describes every proposed expenditure DOWN to the PENNY. It must be exact. If your study will take more than one year, you must provide separate budget lines for each year of the project.

References: Use APA format or the format used in the journal, Criminology.

Appendices: Any graphs, tables, or materials (questionnaires, surveys, etc.) go here.

 

Rationale

The rationale for each assignment is specified in the assignment as described in the syllabus.

 

 


Computer Science CSC 3410 DATA STRUCTURES

Assignments

[These three examples are based on current assignments, since we plan to adapt this course.]

Programming Assignment #2

Description of Program

You are to write a program name phonedir that maintains a list of records containing names and phone numbers. The program will prompt the user for a command, execute the command, then prompt the user for another command. The commands must be chosen from the following possibilities:

a Show all records
d Delete the current record
f Change the first name in the current record
l Change the last name in the current record
n Add a new record
p Change the phone number in the current record
q Quit
s Select a record from the record list to become the current record

The following example illustrates the behavior of each command

MENU DISPLAYED AGAIN

Enter a command from the list above (q to quit): z

Illegal command

Enter a command from the list above (q to quit): q

Here are some other additional requirements for this program:

* Your comments must include design choices, as well as justifications.
* You may assume that phone number contains no spaces.
* After a deletion, there is no record currently selected
* Each record (first name, last name and phone number) must be stored as an object. These object must be stored as a list.
* The list must be kept sorted at all times based on last name. Note: Changing the last name will require resorting.
* Use as many generic algorithms as you can.

What to turn in

Turn in a disk containing phonedir.cpp, phonedir.exe and any other source files and header files in your program. Also turn in listings (hard copies) of all source and header files. The listing should show your program working for several different input cases. The grader will also test the functionality of your program, using different input.

***

Programming Assignment 3

You are to write a program name calc that evaluates an infix expression entered by the user. The expression may contain the following tokens:
(1) Integer constants (a series of decimal digits).
(2) x (representing a value to be supplied later).
(3) Unary operators (+ and -).
(4) Binary operators (+, -, *, / and %).
(5) Parentheses

Spaces between tokens are allowed but not required. The program will convert the expression to postfix (RPN) form and display the converted expression.
In the postfix version of the expression, unary + will be removed, and
the unary operator will be replaced by the _ (underscore) character. The program will repeatedly prompt the user for the value of x, displaying the value of the expression each time. When the user enters the letter q instead of a number, the program terminates.

The following example illustrates the behavior of the program (user input is in bold and red):
Porgram output is in bold and green.

Enter infix expression: (x + 1) * (x – 2) / -4
Converted expression: x 1 + x 2 – * 4 _ /

Enter value of x: 5
Answer to expression: -4

Enter value of x: 7
Answer to expression: -10

Enter value of x: q

If the infix expression contains an error of any kind, the program must display the message Error in expression (with an optional explanation) and then terminate. The following examples illustrate various types of errors:

Enter infix expression: 1 2 +
Error in expression!! No operator between operands. Also last token must be an operand.

Enter infix expression: 10.4
Error in expression!! Cannot accept floating point numbers.

Here are some other additional requirements for this program:

(1) You must use stack objects during the translation from infix to postfix and during the evaluation of the postfix expression.

(2) Operators must have the correct precedence and associativity. Unary operators take precedence over * and /, which in turn take precedence over binary + and -. Unary operators are right associative; binary operators are left associative.

What to turn in

Turn in a disk containing calc.cpp, calc.exe, postfix.h and postfix.cpp.
Also turn in listings (hard copies) of all source and header files. The listing should show your program working for several different input cases. The grader will also test the functionality of your program, using different input.

Hints:

1. Do the program in stages. First, get the infix to postfix conversion working for binary operators. Next, implement the evaluation of the postfix expression. Then add the unary operators. Finally, add code to check the infix expression for errors. Use the examples form the hand out as a starting point for the program, but keep in mind that this code does not allow unary operators, nor does it handle associativity properly.

2. To tell the difference between unary and binary operators, use a
Boolean variable that keeps track of whether the previous token was an operand or an operator. If the program encounters a + or token when the previous token was an operator, then the + or is a unary operator. (Note: Watch out for the beginning of the expression.)

3. To detect errors in the infix expression, you will need to check for several situations:

A binary operator is preceded by an operator or an operand is preceded by an
operand.
An illegal character is encountered (such as a period).
The last token in the expression is not an operand.
There is no left parentheses anywhere in the stack when a right parentheses is
encountered.
The stack contains a left parenthesis when the expression ends.

***

Programming Assignment 4

[Note to CTW committee: This assignment is an advanced version of the
previous example, and allows the students to re-use some of their
previous solution and correct mistakes.]

You are to write a program name expressionTree.cpp that evaluates an infix expression entered by the user. The expression may contain the following tokens:
(1) Integer constants (a series of decimal digits).
(2) Alphabetic characters (representing a value to be supplied later).
(3) Binary operators (+, -, * and /).
(4) Parentheses
(5) Unary operators (+ and -)

You will parse the input expression creating an expression tree with the tokens, the use the postOrder tree traversal algorithm to extract a postfix expression from the tree. Display this postfix expression(String).You will supply this postfix expression (string) to the calculator engine to produce a result.

Spaces between tokens are allowed but not required. In the parse tree as well
as the postfix version of the expression, unary + will be removed, and
the unary – operator will be replaced by the _ (underscore) character. The program will repeatedly prompt the user for the value of x, displaying the value of the expression each time. When the user enters the letter q instead of a number, the program terminates.

The following example illustrates the behavior of the program (user input is in bold):

Enter infix expression: (x + 1) * (x – 2) / -4
Converted expression: x 1 + x 2 – * 4 _ /

Enter value of x: 5
Answer to expression: -4

Enter value of x: 7
Answer to expression: -10

Enter value of x: q

If the infix expression contains an error of any kind, the program must display the message Error in expression (with an optional explanation) and then terminate. The following examples illustrate various types of errors:

Enter infix expression: 1 2 +
Error in expression!! No operator between operands. Also last token must be an operand.

Enter infix expression: 10.4
Error in expression!! Cannot accept floating point numbers.

Enter infix expression: 1 ( + 2)
Error in expression!! No operator between operand and left parentheses.

Enter infix expression: 5 – (x – 2))
Error in expression!! No matching left parentheses for a right parentheses.

Enter infix expression: 1 ** 2
Error in expression!! The * operator cannot be preceded by a * operator.

The output of your program must match the format illustrated in this example.

Here are some other additional requirements for this program:

(1) You must use stack objects and list during the translation from infix to the parse tree and during the evaluation of the postfix expression.

(2) Operators must have the correct precedence and associativity. Unary operators take precedence over * and /, which in turn take precedence over binary + and -. Unary operators are right associative; binary operators are left associative.

What to turn in:

Turn in a disk containing expressionTree.cpp, expressionTree.exe, parse.h and parse.cpp. Also turn in listings (hard copies) of all source and header files. Please mark your name prominently on the disk and listings. You must put comments at the beginning of the program giving the program name, your name, the course number (CSC 3410) and the date.

Hints:

1. Do the program in stages. First, get the infix to parse tree conversion working for binary operators. Next, implement the post order algorithm to produce the postfix expression then evaluate of the postfix expression. Then add the unary operators. Finally, add code to check the infix expression for errors. Use the examples from the hand out as a starting point for the program, but keep in mind that this code does not allow unary operators, nor does it handle associativity properly.

2. To tell the difference between unary and binary operators, use a Boolean variable that keeps track of whether the previous token was an operand or an operator. If the program encounters a + or token when the previous token was an operator, then the + or is a unary operator. (Note: Watch out for the beginning of the expression.)

3. To detect errors in the infix expression, you will need to check for several situations:

A binary operator is preceded by an operator or an operand is preceded by an
operand.
An illegal character is encountered (such as a period).
The last token in the expression is not an operand.
There is no left parentheses anywhere in the stack when a right parentheses is
encountered.
The stack contains a left parenthesis when the expression ends.

4. Use a string to store the postfix expression. Use a stack of operators and a stack of a
list of nodes during the translation from infix to the parse tree.

5. Use the isdigit function (from ) to test whether a character is a digit. Use the atoi function (from ) to convert a string to an integer.

Rationale

The assignments build on each other, becoming more complex and advanced over time. The students are able to re-use some of their previous solutions, after those have been graded, and adapt them to the new assignment. The students must justify their solutions through in-code comments, and demonstrate correctness through several test cases. The grader will likewise test the students’ solutions.


 

Philosophy PHIL 3000 Introductory Seminar in Philosophy (CTW)

Assignments

For this class you will write a paper in three drafts. The paper must: (1) disagree with or develop at least one point made in one of the readings on the assigned issue and (2) make an argument. The paper must be at least 1500-2000 words. As you complete the assignment, you should carefully review the handout on writing philosophy papers.

Rationale

Providing students the opportunity to engage in systematic discussions of primary texts and the philosophical issues they raise allows students to develop the critical thinking skills necessary to successfully defend a position. Additionally, they will need to demonstrate their writing skills in drafts of the seminar paper required in the course.


Political Science POLS 3800 Introduction to Political Research

Assignments

Political Science 3800
Homework #2

In The Millionaire Next Door, authors Thomas J. Stanley and William D. Danko argue that any individual can become wealthy simply by spending his or her money frugally. They present evidence in the form of interviews with millionaires, all of whom (claim to) spend their money quite frugally. Read the attached chapter, in which the authors apply their theory to the process of buying a car, examining millionaire purchasing habits.

In a 3 page paper, critique the research methods used in the chapter you’ve read. This critique must include the following
- Identify the key components of the authors’ research. This includes describing the author’s theory, defining the independent and dependent variables, and describing the author’s research design (i.e., what type of study is it, who are the groups, what’s the treatment, etc.)
- For one of the independent variables the authors employ (and there are many used in the chapter), derive a hypothesis which is predicted by the author’s theory. Then, briefly describe a “non-experiment” (as the phrase is used in the class) which would test the hypothesis. When you’re drawing up your research design, you may assume the ability to collect any reasonably observable data, regardless of what is in the chapter.

Terms used in the book:
- UAW – Under-accumulator of wealth. Somebody who owns less wealth than he or she should, given his income and age. The book’s villains.
- PAW – Prodigious accumulator of wealth. Somebody who owns more wealth than he or she should, given his income and age. The book’s heroes.

Rationale

These assignments ask students to evaluate the quality of research by applying components of CT relevant to the discipline of political science. In this assignment the specific CT elements being examined are identification of question or issue, consideration of assumptions and formulation of a testable hypothesis. By critically examining these aspects of the work students develop an understanding of the issues associated with each of these skills.

 


Real Estate RE 4700 REAL ESTATE ANALYSIS

Assignments

1. Fan Pier Case

a. What were the goals of each of the players in forming this partnership? How would you evaluate the relationship of Athanas and HBC over the years?

b. Assess the approval process governing this megaproject.

c. What would you recommend be built on the site at this point in time? What might be the recommendation of a South Boston community leader, or the Director of the Boston Redevelopment Authority?

d. Compare the story of Fan Pier to that of Battery Park. What lessons can be learned?

2. Southpark IV Case

a. Is this a good property for Laflin to acquire?

b. What assumptions has Laflin made in creating his setup for Southpark IV? What changes, if any, would you make to his setup? What is your projected return for Southpark IV?

c. What price should Laflin offer for Southpark IV? What conditions should he attach to his offer? How might Lonestar try to justify a higher price? What might Southpark IV be worth in five years?

d. Why are there wide variations in the valuation of real property assets?

Students will be assigned questions on each case. Their answers will be evaluated using the rubric. An example of the questions and the objectives on which the answers will be evaluated is shown in the table. The evaluations on each question will be totaled and weighted according to the scheme shown in the rubric.

 

Rationale

The instructor of RE4700 will design and assign cases and projects that will require students to use critical thinking abilities expected in the real estate field.

Specifically, the assignments will require students to:
. Gather, organize, and classify, pertinent information, materials, and data
. Evaluate assumptions, evidence, ideas, and information
. Analyze information
. Consider and/or integrate disparate ideas and information
. Develop rational, reasonable, and informed conclusions
. Present a clear expression of derived conclusions, judgments, and solutions.

Two case write ups will be submitted as drafts for feedback and a score using rubrics; then the students will be required to revise their work and resubmit to the instructor for evaluation and another score. In each case, the students will be required to use knowledge they have gained in earlier prerequisites courses in combination with what they have inferred from the case to draw conclusions about the best course of action in the situation.

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