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Sample Rubrics

Departments are not required to use rubrics when assessing student work in the CTW courses. However, they may find rubrics to be a valuable tool, both for assessment and teaching. This page presents some advice on rubric construction and sample rubrics that faculty may find useful guides should they choose to use rubrics as a tool for assessment.

Rubric Overview

What is a Rubric?

A rubric is an explicit hierarchy of achievement expectations organized along specific dimensions. Rubrics allow students to understand exactly what is expected for an assignment and what score any given response should elicit. Ideally, if a student has a rubric for an assignment, she or he should know what to do and be able to tell how well she or he did it.

Why use a Rubric?

  • Students know what is expected of them.
  • Students can peer review more effectively.
  • Work is generally better by the time it arrives on the professor’s desk.
  • Professors can grade more efficiently and more
    consistently.

When should I use a rubric?

Any assignment longer than a few sentences, including most writing-to-learn assignments, should have graduated expectations attached to it.

How many dimensions are enough?

It depends on the assignment. In some cases such as an assignment which is designed to get people thinking, you might use development or creativity. Some dimensions may be irrelevant for a particular kind of assignment: grammar and mechanics, for example, would be irrelevant in a writing-to-learn assignment. There are also some dependent dimensions as well: if the assignment requires quoting from sources, using the research rubric but not the citation rubric would be inefficacious.

What constitutes an effective rubric?

  • Describes rather than evaluates a student’s answer to the given question. Good, better, and best cannot help a student learn; the student needs to know what specific features turn something good into something better.
  • Guides students toward a better answer to the given question.
  • Provides a description that clearly and logically indicates
    an inevitable grade.
  • Makes legitimate self-assessment possible.
  • Convinces people of its validity and utility.
  • Can be applied with inter-rater reliability

Sample Rubrics

Washington State University Rubric (PDF)

Georgia State University Department of English Rubric (DOC)

Upcoming Events

Jun
1
Wed
12:00 pm Mapping Across the Curriculum @ CETL Learning Studio, Library South, Room 100 - Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning
Mapping Across the Curriculum @ CETL Learning Studio, Library South, Room 100 - Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning
Jun 1 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Mapping Across the Curriculum @ CETL Learning Studio, Library South, Room 100 - Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning
Whether dealing with issues that require processing large amounts of data or struggling to make historical events more visceral by pinpointing them on locations that students walk by every day, simple mapping platforms can radically… more »
Jun
7
Tue
10:00 am iCollege Nuts and Bolts (Online) @ Online Webinar
iCollege Nuts and Bolts (Online) @ Online Webinar
Jun 7 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am
By the end of this session, participants will be able to: Describe the various workflows for adding content to a course Navigate with the D2L environment Use the Manage Files area to add content Use… more »
Jun
8
Wed
2:30 pm SPSS
SPSS
Jun 8 @ 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm
SPSS Statistics is a powerful application that can read and analyze data as well as generate reports and graphs. In this workshop, you’ll learn how to define variables, enter data, import data from other types… more »
Jun
10
Fri
10:00 am iCollege Gradebook (Clarkston) @ CH2160 - Perimeter College - Clarkston Campus
iCollege Gradebook (Clarkston) @ CH2160 - Perimeter College - Clarkston Campus
Jun 10 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am
Learn how to setup your iCollege gradebook, create and manage grade columns, enter grades, track a student’s progress, and calculate final grades based on points or percentages. At the end of the workshop, you should… more »

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